Te Pupu and Te Hoata Sisters of fire

About

According to Māori culture and traditions, geysers such as Pohutu are viewed as gifts from the gods.

The local legends tell the Kōrero (story) of the high priest Ngātoroirangi who arrived on New Zealand shores on the Te Arawa waka (canoe). He and several of his people travelled inland, heading past Lake Taupō and onto Tongariro, when they were struck by blistering cold snow storms.

Fearing for his life, Ngātoroirangi called out to his sisters, Te Pupu and Te Hoata, who came from Hawaiki in the form of fire under the earth.

Lifting their heads above the earth’s surface in search of their brother, the sisters left behind geysers, hot pools, and volcanoes throughout the Bay of Plenty.

Did you know?

Te Puia’s 60 hectare site in Te Whakarewarewa Valley has more than 500 geothermal features.

Not only did these gifts allow our people to cook and bathe, but they also brought a booming tourism industry to our corner of the world.

Te Pupu and Te Hoata Sisters of fire

According to Māori culture, geysers such as Pohutu are viewed as gifts from the gods.